Showing posts with label scavenger hunts. Show all posts
Showing posts with label scavenger hunts. Show all posts

Friday, July 17, 2020

An Update to an Old Web Quest Assignment

I've been doing a lot of reading this summer. Some of the books that I've been reading this summer are books that I've read in the past but am revisiting because I've always found that I pick up new things the second or third time through. Two of those books that I've revisited this summer are Invent to Learn by Sylvia Libow Martinez and Gary Stager and Empowering Online Learning by Curtis Bonk and Ke Zhang. The combination has sparked some new ideas (perhaps re-ignited) for me about how to structure prompts for students.

Early in Empowering Online Learning Bonk and Zhang write about conducting a web quest or online scavenger hunt activity. They were writing in 2007/2008 when web quests were still a relatively new activity to many teachers who were trying to help students develop search skills. The example that Bonk and Zhang gave was essentially a list of questions for students to answer with the help of a search engine.

As I re-read the web quest activity outlined by Bonk and Zhang I remembered Stager's refrain of "a good prompt is worth a thousand words." Combining those two elements I came up with an update to an old search lesson activity that I used to do with some of my high school students.

The old search activity that I used to do with students was to have them pick a popular stock from the NYSE or NASDAQ and then find and evaluate buy/ sell/ hold articles they found about those stocks. The updated version of that lesson is to have students look up ten data points (for example: volume, short interest, cash flow, EPS) about a stock like AAPL (Apple) and then research ten ways that a professional analyst would use those data points to create a buy/ sell/ hold rating.

Monday, June 11, 2018

Free Alternative to GooseChase

This morning I received the following email from a reader who wants to create a digital scavenger hunt for an upcoming conference.
"GooseChase has the features that I want but would cost $200. That is a tough sell for a game no matter how great I think it would be. This activity is not only a way to encourage teachers to make connections, it has clear application to the classroom. But, like I said, $200.... Do you have another idea?"
My response was to take a look at what Metaverse can do. I've often described Metaverse as a DIY platform for making educational versions of games like Pokemon Go. Through the Metaverse Studio anyone can program an augmented reality app without having any prior coding or programming knowledge. You can create scavenger hunts that are based on locations. You can also create augmented reality games that are location-independent.


You can even use Metaverse to create digital breakout games.

Monday, October 16, 2017

QR Code Generators and Readers for Chromebooks

Last week a teacher contacted me to see if it was possible to read QR codes with a Chromebook. I had never tried this myself, but I figured it was possible so I did some digging and found some reader apps for Chromebooks.

After I tried these out I can say it is definitely easier to read QR codes with tablets or phones. I found it a little awkward to line up the QR code sometimes, but these readers still worked on my Chromebook.

  • Web QR- The website allows you to both create QR codes and scan them. 
  • QR Code Generator- This website allows you to create and scan QR codes as well as create videos using your webcam, screencast, and merge PDF files. 
  • Scan QR app- Simple app that will scan a QR code. 
  • QuickQR Code- Create and scan QR codes.

If you are looking for additional ways to create QR codes, check out Five Ways to Create and Use QR Codes in Your Classroom.

Applications for Education
QR codes can be used to distribute information to students or direct them all to the same page. They can be used for fun activities like scavenger hunts as well.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Goosechase Scavenger Hunt

GoosechaseEdu is an app that combines the excitement of a scavenger hunt with mobile technology. Games consist of a series of missions that are completed by individuals or teams.

Once you create an account, you can opt to use games from the game library or you can design your own missions. Once your game is ready you will share the link with the participants. Participants need to download the app which works on both Android and iOS devices and have a Goosechase account. Points are earned for completing missions which requires participants to either submit a photo, answer with text, or check into a specified location. Missions might require participants to complete an action such as solving a math problem and uploading it or finding the area of the Louisiana Purchase and submit the correct answer. The game organizer sets a time limit and the team with the most points when time is up wins.

Applications for Education
Goosechase is great for team building for both students and adults. Since games are customizable, they can be used for introducing new material or reviewing for a test. Goosechase is good for field trips as well.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Go On a Virtual Art Scavenger Hunt in the Google Art Project

One of the most exciting things released by Google in 2011 was the Google Art Project. Yesterday, Google announced a huge expansion of the collections that visitors can view in the Google Art Project. The Google Art Project now contains more than 30,000 images from 151 museums in 40 countries. Of those 151 museums there is now Street View imagery for 46 museums.

For the museums that have Street View imagery just look for the Pegman and drag it to the museum in order to virtually tour it using the same interface style you experience in Google Maps Streetview. Inside the museum just double click to zoom to a location. You can also open a floor plan overview and click on a room to navigate to that part of the museum.

Learn how to navigate the Google Art Project in the video below.


Applications for Education
One of the best parts of the Art Project powered by Google is the option to create your own artwork collection while visiting each museum. As you're touring a museum click on the "pencil and clipboard" icon on any work of art to add it to your collection. To create a collection you must be signed into your Google account. You could have your students go on an art scavenger hunt to create collections of art according to a theme, time period, or artist.

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Zunal - Build, Share, and Find Web Quests

Over the weekend someone recently asked me if I knew of any tools for building web quests. At the time I couldn't think of any resources, but then I scoured my Google Notebook and found Zunal. Zunal is a free service that walks you through the process of creating a web quest. If you have never built web quest because you weren't sure how to get started or just saw the process as too overwhelming, give Zunal a try. Zunal offers step-by-step directions that make it possible for even the most technophobic teacher to create a webquest that students will enjoy and learn from.

Once you have registered on Zunal you can get started building your web quest. If you would like to see how other teachers have used Zunal, you can browse the galleries of web quests to get ideas or use one of the web quests if it meets the needs of your curriculum.

Applications for Education
Zunal is a good place for technophobic teachers to build their first web quests. The galleries web quests are handy if you're short on time or short on imagination for creating new web quests.