Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Use ImageCodr to Create Correct Image Attributions

Creative Commons licensing makes many photos available for re-use that we otherwise could not use. The trouble is properly citing Creative Commons licensed works can sometimes be a confusing, multistep process. ImageCodr aims to make that process easier.

ImageCodr generates properly formatted Creative Commons attributions for images that you find on Flickr. Once you've found a Flickr image that you want to use just paste its URL into the ImageCodr code generator to get a properly formatted image code with Creative Commons attribution.


Applications for Education
ImageCodr could be a good tool for students to use when they're adding images to blog posts. ImageCodr gives students all of the code and attributions necessary for using a Creative Commons image found on Flickr in their blog posts.

Thanks to Larry Ferlazzo for sharing this last week. 

MasteryConnect Partners With Solution Tree

Full Disclosure: Mastery Connect is an advertiser on Free Technology for Teachers.

Mastery Connect provides a free community for educators to share and discuss their plans around Common Core standards. As a member of the community you can browse and download the materials shared by other educators. There are currently more than one hundred pages of shared materials. Of course, as a member of the community you can share your own materials. You can also follow and have threaded Twitter-style discussions with other members of the community. All materials found in Mastery Connect are tied to specific standards in the Common Core. Click here to join the community today.

This summer MasteryConnect partnered with Solution Tree and presented at Solution Tree's Professional Learning Communities at Work institutes. Solution Tree's Rick Dufour endorsed MasteryConnect's community in this video.

Monday, October 8, 2012

The Why Files Explains the Science of the News

The Why Files is a resource designed for students to learn about the science of stories in the news. The Why Files doesn't cover every current events news story, just the stories that have connections to science concepts. For example, one of the recent stories is about the launch of the SpaceX rocket. The story goes on to explain in text, image, and video the science and history of rockets being launched into space.

Applications for Education
Most of the material on The Why Files is geared toward an elementary and middle school audience. The teachers' section of The Why Files offers pdf guides and quizzes that you can use to teach the science of the stories featured on the front page of The Why Files. The Why Files could also be a good resource for students to explore independently or with their parents.

Science Netlinks - Dozens of Online Learning Activities

Science Netlinks offers dozens of lesson plans and online learning activities. The lessons and activities are cover a wide variety of science topics. All of the lesson plans are sorted by grade level, but you can also sort the lesson plans by science benchmark standards. A series of icons also indicates if each lesson plan has a printable worksheet, e-worksheet, or is an interactive experience.

Applications for Education
Science Netlinks provides science teachers with a good collection of lesson plans aligned to the benchmarks for Science Literacy. In addition to lesson plans, Science Netlinks offers a selection of reviewed resource websites for K-12 science teachers.

Rutgers Riot Animated Research Tutorial

Rutgers' Riot is an animated research tutorial. It plays like a five part animated movie. Each part of the movie features characters explaining an aspect of the research process. The five parts are selecting a topic, finding sources, choosing keywords, identifying citations, and evaluating sources. There are text documents available to accompany the videos.




















Applications for Education
Rutgers' animated research tutorial could be a good resource for introducing or refreshing research techniques in a clear and simple way.