Monday, May 16, 2016

Access LitCharts on Your iPhone or Android Phone

Last week I published a blog post about LitCharts. Shortly after that post went live my friend Denise texted me to say how much she loves the LitCharts iPhone app. Until then I wasn't aware that LitCharts offered an iOS app. It turns out that LitCharts is also available as a free Android app.

The LitCharts iOS and Android apps offer the same great literature guides that are found on the LitCharts website. The apps are free and advertisement-free. Besides the guides themselves, the best aspect of the apps is that they can be used offline. Students can choose which guides that they want to use offline.

LitCharts features background information on a book's author, a color-coded list of themes in the book, a plot summary, a character list and summary, and a theme-tracker. The theme-tracker helps students keep track of literary themes with examples throughout a book.


Apply for Complimentary Registration to the Practical Ed Tech BYOD Camp

A couple of weeks ago the folks at Otus approached me about sponsoring the Practical Ed Tech BYOD Camp. I wasn't looking for direct sponsorship of the event so I proposed that they instead sponsor a few people to attend. They agreed and I'm happy to announce that Otus will sponsor three people to attend the Practical Ed Tech Summer Camp on July 10th and 11th in Portland, Maine.

Otus will sponsor the registration for three people to attend the Practical Ed Tech BYOD Camp. If you are interested in attending, you will need to complete a short application on Otus' website. Otus will choose and notify the winners.

The Practical Ed Tech BYOD Camp is a hands-on exploration of how to use free technology tools in your classroom. This two day workshop is based on my framework for using technology to help students discover new information, discuss their ideas, and demonstrate their knowledge. This is for people who work in schools that have BYOD programs and 1:1 laptop programs (Mac or Windows), iPads, Android tablets, Windows tablets, or who have shared computers in a classroom or lab setting.

You can learn more about the camp, read FAQs, and find complete registration information on the camp landing page.

Sunday, May 15, 2016

How to Create a Biking or Walking Route Map in Google Maps

On Saturday morning I rode in a charity bike ride in my community. That ride was well mapped and planned thanks in part to Google Maps. If you want to create a biking route map or walking route map, follow the steps that I outline in the video embedded below.


Applications for Education
Warm weather is finally here (in the Northern Hemisphere) and it's a good time to encourage students and their parents to enjoy some healthy outdoor activities. Creating some maps of safe biking routes and walking routes then posting them on a school website could be a good way to encourage participating in outdoor activities.

How to Be Inspired When Writing - A Student's Advice

This morning I was reading through an email from Next Vista for Learning when I found a new student-produced video titled How to Be Inspired When Writing. The short video has some nice tips for students including a closing note to give credit to the sources of inspiration. The video is embedded below.



Take a look at these seven resources for additional ways to inspire creative writing.

Hopscotch - Learn Coding Basics on Your iPad or iPhone

Hopscotch is a free iOS app that introduces students to programming logic. The app originally launched as an iPad-only app. Last week the developers released an iPhone-friendly version of the free app.

In Hopscotch students put command boxes into order to make cartoon avatars move and draw lines. Students can program one or all of the cartoon avatars to move and follow commands based on touch or on the movement of their iPads.

Applications for Education
Hopscotch was developed by the same people who developed Daisy the Dinosaur. Daisy the Dinosaur teaches kids younger than nine years old some basic programming logic. Using Hopscotch is a logical next step after completing the challenges in Daisy the Dinosaur.

H/T to Lifehacker.