Monday, March 12, 2018

Three Good Tools for Annotating Images Online

Annotating images can be a good activity for students to do illustrate their understanding of a process by adding information to a blank flowchart. Annotating images is also a good way for students to highlight and identify parts of a diagram like one of a plant cell. I have had students annotate images to identify geological features in images of the Grand Canyon. Here are three tools that your students can use to annotate images online.

OneNote users can annotate images in the web, desktop, and mobile versions of OneNote. You can upload an image to a page in your notebook and then use the drawing and typing tools to write on top of the image. One of the neat things about the web and desktop versions of OneNote is that you can search the web for images right from your notebook.  When using the mobile version of OneNote you can add images by importing them from your phone's camera roll or by taking a new picture with your phone's camera.

Google Keep users can annotate images on their mobile phones and or in the browser-based version of Google Keep. In the browser-based version of Google Keep you have to import images. In the mobile version of Google Keep you can import from your camera roll or take a new picture with your camera. Watch my video below to see how you can annotate images in the browser-based version of Google Keep.



A tool from Classtools called Image Annotator does exactly what it says on the tin. I made the following short video to demonstrate how easy it is to use the Classtools Image Annotator. In the video I demonstrate annotating an image of a map, but you can use it to annotate any PNG, JPG, or GIF image that you have the rights to use.

Timelinely - Annotate Videos With Text and Pictures

Timelinely is a new tool for annotating videos that are hosted on YouTube. I learned about Timelinely through one of Larry Ferlazzo's recent blog posts. I tried Timelinely for myself this afternoon.

Timelinely makes it easy to get started. You just have to copy a YouTube URL into the Timelinely homepage to get started. Once you have entered the URL for a video, a new screen appears that allows you to add tags or annotations to the timeline of the video. You can do this while the video plays or you can simply jump to a place on the video to add annotations. Your annotations can include text or images. As you can see in the screenshot below, I included an image of my friend Tom Richey in the annotation that I made on one of his YouTube videos.

Before you get too involved with Timelinely it's important to note that you'll have to create an account in order to save and share your work. You can create an account by using your Google account, by using your Facebook account, or by signing up with any email address. You can share your annotated version of a video via email and social media. Embedding the annotated version is a feature that Timelinely says is coming soon.

Applications for Education
One of things that I like about Timelinely is the option to include pictures in your annotations. I can see that feature being used to include an alternate example for students to view when watching a math lesson.

I'm not sure that Timelinely is any better than a handful of similar services, but it is nice to have options

1766 Free Lesson Plans for Art Teachers

My refrigerator is quickly getting covered with the art my toddler makes with her Crayola crayons and construction paper. Looking at one of her boxes of crayons over the weekend I was reminded of Crayola's huge collection of lesson plans.

Crayola's lesson plan library contains 1766 free lesson plans. There are lesson plans for every grade from pre-K through 12th grade. As you might expect, the lesson plans incorporate one or more Crayola products, but you could probably substitute in similar products made by other companies. The lesson plans include step-by-step directions as well as a list of standards addressed by in the lesson.

All of the lesson plans on the Crayola site have an art component, but many cover topics in other areas. For example, this lesson plan on storytelling traditions is based upon a couple of brief history lessons. And this lesson plan for high school students focuses on using whiteboards and dry erase markers in group or individual problem solving. You can search and browse Crayola's lesson plan catalog according to grade level, subject area, and topic.

Saturday, March 10, 2018

How Inventions Change History

This evening I was looking back at some resources that I have for teaching about Eli Whitney and the cotton gin. Included in that list was a YouTube video that demonstrated how the cotton gin worked. Next to that video I found a TED-Ed lesson titled How Inventions Change History (For Better or Worse). The lesson is centered around Eli Whitney's invention of the cotton gin and the impact that it had on slavery in the southern United States.


In addition to considering the impact of the cotton gin, students who view this TED-Ed lesson are asked to consider the impact of other inventions on the world.

Quizzes, Syrup, and Public Domain Videos - The Week in Review

Good evening from Maine where the winter keeps on going. This week we had lots of new snow fall. As a skier, I love the snow. But many of my friends were not so happy about the latest snowstorm. In other news from Lake Wobegon Paris Hill, this week I scheduled a new webinar for teachers interested in classroom video creation projects. The webinar is called 5 Video Projects for Almost Every Classroom. You can find all of the webinar registration details here.

Here are this week's most popular posts:
1. The Library of Congress Seeks a Teacher-in-Residence
2. 10 Free Apps for Elementary School Math Lessons
3. My Top 5 Choices for Making Multimedia Quizzes
4. New Shared File Organization Coming to Google Drive
5. 8 Changes to Google Docs & Slides Menus
6. Making Maple Syrup - A Science and Math Lesson
7. Three Places to Find Public Domain Video Clips

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Practical Ed Tech is the brand through which I offer PD webinars.
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MySimpleShow offers a great way to create animated videos for free.
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