Saturday, January 4, 2020

How to Combine Multiple Google Forms Into One

Import questions is one of the many useful, yet often overlooked functions in Google Forms. The import questions function lets you draw questions from your existing forms to use in a new form. In the following video I demonstrate how you can use the import questions function to combine questions from multiple Google Forms to create one new one.


Applications for Education
One of the things that I typically do at the end of the semester is create practice quizzes for my students by compiling questions from quizzes that they have already taken. Usually, I focus on including the questions that were most frequently answered incorrectly earlier in the semester. Google Forms makes this easy to do. By using the import questions function in Google Forms I can quickly create a new form that is just a compilation of questions from prior forms. The determination of which questions to pick is done by looking at the summary data from the prior quizzes.

Friday, January 3, 2020

The Practical Ed Tech Podcast Episode 26 - Old Decade, New Decade

This afternoon I recorded the 26th episode of The Practical Ed Tech Podcast. In this episode I shared some important news about how I'm publishing new content in 2020, highlighted some "decade in review" articles, and answered questions from readers and viewers like you. The complete show notes can be read here.

Listen to episode 26 of The Practical Ed Tech Podcast right here or on your favorite podcast network.



Listen to all episodes of the podcast here or find them on the following podcast networks:

A Comparison of 6 Blogging Services for Teachers and Students - Updated

About five years ago I assembled a series charts that compared the features of ed tech tools that served similar purposes. Some of the charts I made were about video tools, animation tools, timeline tools, digital portfolios, and blogs. To start 2020 I'm revisiting those charts and updating them to better reflect the current features and availability of various tools. The first chart that I've updated is this one that compares and ranks six popular blogging services.

Comparison of Six Blogging Services for Teachers outlines the administration options, design options, domain mapping options, and TOS conditions amongst other key features to look for when picking a blogging service to use in your classroom. You can get a Google Docs copy of the chart here and a PDF version here.
While you're exploring blogging tools, take a look at these ten blogging activities for K-12 students.

Here's my ranking of the blogging services featured in the chart:

My ranking of these services:
1. Blogger - It’s free and easy to set-up. It can be integrated into your Google Apps for Education account which means that you and your students can use the same usernames and passwords that they use in all other Google tools. You can make your blog private (up to 100 members invited by email). The drawback to it is that a lot of school filters flag it as “social media” and block it on those grounds.

1a. Edublogs - Probably the best option for elementary school and middle school use. Blogs and individual blog posts can be made private, password-protected, or public. You can create and manage your students’ accounts. Outstanding customer support!

2. Weebly for Education - It’s free to have up to 40 students in your account. You can manage your students’ accounts. You can have students contribute to a group blog and or let them manage their own individual blogs.

3. SeeSaw.me - SeeSaw was originally launched as a digital portfolio tool. The addition of a blogging component was made in January 2016. The blogging component of SeeSaw allows you to import and display your students’ digital artifacts publicly or privately. There is not much you can do with SeeSaw in terms of customization of layout and color scheme.

4. WordPress.org - If you have the technical acumen or the time to learn it (it’s not that hard), self-hosting a blog that runs on WordPress software will give you the ultimate in control and flexibility. You will be able to create and manage student accounts, have a nearly infinite variety of customization options, and you’ll be able to move your blog from server to server whenever you want to. That said, you will have to pay for hosting (or convince your school to give you server space) and you will be responsible for maintaining security updates and backing-up your blog regularly.

5. WordPress.com - It’s easy to use and is free, but with some serious limitations at the free level. The free version displays advertising on your blog which you cannot control. The free version also doesn’t allow embedding content from many third-party sites.

Thursday, January 2, 2020

How to Create and Publish Multimedia Collages

Now that Canva offers an education version that provides all of the pro features for free to teachers and students, there is a ton of neat things that students and teachers can make. One example of that is designing and publishing multimedia collages. Along with pictures, text, and hyperlinks you can add video and audio files to any of the designs that you make or modify in Canva. Obviously, the video and audio will only play if you publish your design online. Fortunately, Canva offers a couple ways to publish your collages online. Those options are to publish the collage as a simple stand-alone webpage or embed it into an existing webpage.

In the following video I demonstrate how to create and publish multimedia collages in Canva.


Applications for Education
Making a multimedia collage in Canva could be a good way for students to assemble simple one page digital portfolios to showcase examples of their work.I can also see making multimedia collages in Canva as a fun way for students to organize a collection of digital artifacts to summarize key points in a time period or in a person's life.

What Do You Want to Learn in 2020?

I posed this question on Practical Ed Tech and I'm going to pose it here too. What do you want to learn in 2020? It could be learning to code or it could be a new instructional strategy or it might be learning how to cartwheel. Whatever it is, I'd love to hear about it. And if it's something that I can help you with, you can bet that I'll cover it on the blog, in video, or in a podcast this year. So go ahead and fill out the short form below and I'll do my best to help you learn something new in 2020.

By the way, I want to learn new instructional strategies for adult education and some new Python skills in 2020.