Thursday, February 27, 2020

Rubrics for Videos, Podcasts, Blogs, and More

Over the years I've referenced the University of Wisconsin Stout's collection of rubrics for multimedia projects. It has been a few years since I last featured it so I think it's time to highlight it again.

UW Stout's collection of rubrics is organized by task or project type. There are sections in the collection for presentations, eportfolios and websites, social media, group work, graphic organizers, videos, games, writing, and the research process.

The section containing rubrics on the research process is new since the last time that I wrote about UW Stout's collection of rubrics. In the section on research process there are rubrics appropriate for elementary school, middle school, and high school students. There is even a link to Joyce Valenza's question brainstorming template that students can use to help them refine their searches.

Applications for Education
What prompted me to revisit UW Stout's collection of rubrics was the need for a podcast rubric. Sure enough, there is one right at the top of the presentation section in the collection. The rubric isn't a perfect fit for my needs, but it does provide me with a great starting point for making my own podcasting rubric.

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

The Practical Ed Tech Podcast - Episode 34 Featuring Dr. La'Tonya Rease Miles

This evening I had the pleasure of talking with Dr. La'Tonya Rease Miles and recording our conversation for The Practical Ed Tech Podcast.

LT Rease Miles is the Director of First Year Experience at UCLA. About a month ago in Amarillo, Texas I saw her give a great presentation about hidden curriculum and the challenges that first generation college students face that we might unknowingly overlook. We spoke after the conference and I invited her to join me on the podcast to talk and share more about the concept of hidden curriculum.

I thoroughly enjoyed my conversation with LT and I hope that you enjoy listening to it too. If you're a high school teacher, guidance counselor, or a college faculty member, I think you'll pick up some fantastic insights and ideas from listening to this episode of the podcast. You can listen to the full episode here or on your favorite podcast network.





Listen to all episodes of the podcast here or find them on the following podcast networks:

The Google Keep Chrome Extension is Back!

Last week the Google Keep Chrome extension stopped working. After five days of no responses from Google on the support page for the extension, the extension was updated today and has started working again. If you disabled or removed the extension last week because you were getting an "extension corrupt" message, you can now reinstall it from the Keep Chrome extension page.

On a related note, in the video that is embedded below I provide an overview of ten handy features of Google Keep.

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Join the Student Blogging Challenge in March

Every year Edublogs hosts a couple of student blogging challenges. The next one begins on March 15th. The challenge is open to all K-12 classrooms. Your classroom blog or student blogs don't have to be hosted on Edublogs in order to participate.

The 2020 Edublogs Student Blogging Challenge provides eight weekly blogging suggestions suitable for K-12 students. Every week students complete the challenge then you can submit the URL of your students' posts to be included in a larger Student Blogging Challenge form that other participating classes can see. By submitting the URLs of your students' work, you're providing them with an opportunity to get feedback from other students and teachers who are participating the challenge.


Applications for Education
Blogging can be a great way to get students interested in writing and publishing their work for an audience. The challenges of classroom blogging have always been coming up with things for kids to write about and building an audience for your students' work. The Edublogs Student Blogging Challenge addresses both of those challenges.

Mixkit - Hundreds of Free Music and Video Clips for Multimedia Presentations

Mixkit is a website that offers hundreds of free music files and videos that you can download to use in your multimedia projects. The licensing terms for assets on Mixkit are clear. You can download videos and audio files from Mixkit to re-use and remix. You don't have to credit Mixkit, but they will appreciate it if you do.

To find videos and music tracks on Mixkit you can search by keyword, click on the content tags, or simply browse through the galleries. The videos that you find on Mixkit could be described as b-roll footage. In other words, you're not going to find videos from your favorite television shows or YouTube channels. Similarly, the music on Mixkit is largely instrumental music.

Applications for Education
Mixkit could be a good resource to bookmark and share with your students when they need music or videos to use in their own video projects, podcasts, or other multimedia presentations. If you're worried about your students wasting time browsing through the Mixkit galleries, create a shared Google Drive folder that you add a collection of Mixkit files to for your students to use.