Tuesday, April 6, 2021

A Handful of Jamboard Tutorial Videos

Last week I posted a video that contained a quick overview of five Jamboard features that are helpful to teachers and students. That was just the latest in a series of videos that I have made about Jamboard over the last couple of years. To learn more about Jamboard and how you might use it in your classroom, take a look at the following videos. 

I made this video a couple of years ago when many people thought that you had to own one of Google's physical Jamboard interactive whiteboards in order to use Jamboard.Google.com


How to Use Jambord & Screencastify to Make Whiteboard Videos



How to Make Whiteboard Videos With Loom & Jamboard



How to Use Jamboard in Google Meet
You can use Jamboard in Google Meet without having to share your whole screen. 



Making Magnetic Poetry With Jamboard and Google Classroom


This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin, Today Headline, and 711Web.

Monday, April 5, 2021

How to Use Videos in Microsoft Forms Quizzes

Microsoft Forms has improved a lot over the last few years. In fact, there are some things about it that I prefer over Google Forms. One of those things is the way in which you can use videos as question prompts. 

In Microsoft Forms you can include a video as a part of question instead of having it be its own stand-alone item as Google Forms makes you do. In Google Forms you insert a video then write a question directly below it. The flaw with that system is that it's easy to accidentally move the video away from its corresponding question(s). In Microsoft Forms the video is actually a part of the question prompt so that the video and its corresponding question are always connected. 

In this video I demonstrate how to use video in Microsoft Forms. The video is part of a series of Microsoft Forms tutorials available on my YouTube channel and here on Practical Ed Tech



Applications for Education
Using short video clips in a quiz or review activity is something that I do fairly regularly. I use short, often silent, clips to have students make observations about network activity then answer a few questions. The advantage of Microsoft Forms is that when I use the "shuffle questions" option the videos are still connected to the questions unlike in Google Forms where the videos aren't always connected to the questions after using the shuffle option.

This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin , 711Web, and Today Headline.

Saturday, April 3, 2021

Hybrid Instruction, Boxes, and Tires - The Week in Review

Good morning from Maine where the sun is rising and it's going to be a nice spring day. That doesn't mean we don't still have some snow lingering in the yard. My dogs are grateful for the few remaining piles of snow that we have. My daughters will be happy that tomorrow's Easter egg hunt won't require them to wear snowsuits and boots like last year. 

This week I'm taking a slightly different approach to my week-in-review list. Usually, I just list the seven most popular posts that appeared on Free Technology for Teachers during the week. This week I'm including a few posts from the other sites that I maintain. 

These were my most popular posts of the week:
1. Three Areas That Can Help Teachers Improve Hybrid Learning for All Students
2. How to Make and Share Google Jamboard Templates
3. A Fun and Educational Use of Cardboard Boxes
4. How to Record Voice Notes in Gmail, Google Classroom, Google Slides, and Google Docs
5. A Great Series of Videos for Those Who Have I.T. Career Questions
6. Google Meet Transcripts Automatically Saved as New Google Docs
7. How to Fix a Flat Bike Tire

On-demand Professional Development
Other Places to Follow Me:
  • The Practical Ed Tech Newsletter comes out every Sunday evening/ Monday morning. It features my favorite tip of the week and the week's most popular posts from Free Technology for Teachers.
  • My YouTube channel has more than 34,000 subscribers watching my short tutorial videos on a wide array of educational technology tools. 
  • I've been Tweeting as @rmbyrne for fourteen years. 
  • The Free Technology for Teachers Facebook page features new and old posts from this blog throughout the week. 
  • And if you're curious about my life outside of education, you can follow me on Instagram or Strava.
This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin and 711Web.

Webinar Recording - Two Ed Tech Guys Take Questions and Share Cool Stuff - Episode 34

On Thursday afternoon Rushton Hurley from Next Vista for Learning and I co-hosted the 34th episode of Two Ed Tech Guys Take Questions and Share Cool Stuff. It was another fun half-hour of answering all kinds of questions. We also shared a couple of cool tools including one that isn't available right now, but at the current pace of AI development it might be available in the not-too-distant future. The recording of the episode along with the slides can seen here or as embedded below.

Some of the questions that we answered in this episode included batch export of Google Photos, alternatives to Smart Notebooks, ideas for using Jamboard and Wizer.me, recording videos, and developing your own mobile apps.


This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin , 711Web, and Today Headline.

Friday, April 2, 2021

Two New Google Workspace Features for Students - Including Saving Google Forms in Progress!

This week Google announced two new Google Workspaces for Education features that are sure to be beneficial to students. Both of the new features are things that teachers and students have requested for years. The first is a new set of citation options in Google Documents. The second is a new "save in progress" option in Google Forms.

Google Docs has included a citation and bibliography tool for quite a while. This week Google announced that new citation options are going to be available in Google Docs soon, if you don't already have them. The new options include citing films (movies), television shows, and a catch-all miscellaneous category.

The other new Google Workspaces for Education feature that Google announced this week is an option to save Google Forms responses in progress. Google is calling this feature "draft responses." Draft responses will let students save their responses to a Google Form without having to actually submit the form or leave the form open in the background. Draft responses can be saved for up to thirty days. Students will need to be signed into a Google Workspaces for Education account in order to save their responses in progress.

Draft responses in Google Forms is a beta product. Your Google Workspaces for Education domain administrator will need to apply for the beta in order for your school to use it. Domain administrators can apply for the beta here.

Applications for Education
As I mentioned above, the ability to save Google Forms responses in progress is a feature that teachers have requested for years. This feature will remove some of the pressure to give students a finite period of time to complete a quiz or other activity in Google Forms. I have never been a fan of timed quizzes so this new feature is particularly appealing to me.
 
The new options for citing sources in Google Documents is also going to be helpful to students. In particular, I foresee it being helpful to students in film studies classes as well as history students who might be viewing archival television news broadcasts.

On a related note, here's how to use the citation tool in Google Docs and here's how to create a quiz in Google Forms.

This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin , 711Web, and Today Headline.