Monday, October 18, 2021

An Overview of Google Forms Quiz Settings

Back in July I published a series of videos and blog posts detailing what you need to know to get started using Google Classroom, Drive, Docs, Slides, and Forms in your classroom (those are linked below). Of course, Google had to make some updates to Google Forms right at the start of the new school year and in doing so added some more functionality to Google Forms while also moving the location of some settings menus. That's why I recorded a new overview of Google Forms quiz settings. 

In my new video, An Overview of Google Forms Quiz Settings, you'll learn:

  • How to access the settings. 
  • What each setting does. 
  • Why you may or may not want to use some settings. 



More Helpful Google Forms Tutorials:

How to Share Google Arts & Culture Experiences in Google Classroom

Last week Google Arts & Culture published a great online exhibit titled Walk the Great Wall. It's a fantastic colleciton of Street View imagery and multimedia stories about the Great Wall of China. As I wrote last week, Walk the Great Wall includes detailed imagery of the bricks of the wall, short lessons about the construction of the Great Wall, stories of myths and legends of the Great Wall, and lots of imagery of the Great Wall from end to end in all four seasons of the year.  

The only "problem" with the Walk the Great Wall Google Arts & Culture exhibit is that it is so large that if you want all your students to look at a specific section of it all at once, you have to share individual sections with your students instead of the whole exhibit. Fortunately, Google does make it relatively easy to share just a section of a Google Arts & Culture exhibit with your students. In this new video I demonstrate exactly how to do that. 



Applications for Education
Sharing a specific section of a Google Arts & Culture exhibit is a good way to get all of your students looking at and discussing an element of an exhibit at the same time. Alternatively, you could assign different sections of an exhibit to groups of students then have them share observations with the whole class. 

The method that I demonstrated in the video can also be used with other learning management systems. Simply get the sharing link from the section of the exhibit that you want to share and then manually paste it into an assignment in your LMS instead of using the Google Classroom button.

Saturday, October 16, 2021

Copyright, Handbooks, and Goals - The Week in Review

Good morning from Vermont where in a few hours I'll be riding in my last bike race of the year, The Hibernator. I still have fitness goals to reach this (riding 7,500 miles in 2021 is the big one), but this is my last event of the year and it looks like the weather is going to be a typical northern New England mix of clouds, drizzle, and a large temperature swing during the day. It should be fun! I hope that you have something fun planned for your weekend as well. 

Before I head out on my bike I have this week's list of the most popular posts of the week to share with you. Take a look and see if there's something new or interesting that you missed during the week. 

These were the week's most popular posts:
1. Get Your Free Copy of The Practical Ed Tech Handbook
2. Transcribing Early Copyright Applications
3. The Science of Cake! - And 83 Other Food Science Lessons
4. Ten Skills Students Can Learn from Google's Applied Digital Skills Lessons
5. Five Genius Hour Activities With Tract - Students Teaching Students
6. Taskade - A Complete Project Planning Solution for Teachers and Students
7. What Does Indigenous Mean? - And Why Some States No Longer Celebrate Columbus Day

Thank you for your support!
Your registrations in Practical Ed Tech courses (listed below) help me keep Free Technology for Teachers going.

A big thank you also goes to the companies whose advertising helps keep the lights on.
On-demand Professional Development
Other Places to Follow Me:
  • The Practical Ed Tech Newsletter comes out every Sunday evening/ Monday morning. It features my favorite tip of the week and the week's most popular posts from Free Technology for Teachers.
  • My YouTube channel has more than 38,000 subscribers watching my short tutorial videos on a wide array of educational technology tools. 
  • I've been Tweeting as @rmbyrne for fourteen years. 
  • The Free Technology for Teachers Facebook page features new and old posts from this blog throughout the week. 
  • If you're curious about my life outside of education, you can follow me on Instagram or Strava.
This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. If you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne's) work include CloudComputin and WayBetterSite. Featured image captured by Richard Byrne.

Gary Paulsen Talks About Reading and Writing

Gary Paulsen's book, Hatchet was the first book that I willingly and eagerly read from cover to cover when I was in elementary school. It filled my suburban child mind with great thoughts of adventure and a little virtual escape at a time when my own parents were going through divorce. The book meant and still means a lot to me. That's why I was sad to learn of Gary Paulsen's passing earlier this week.

After learning of Gary Paulsen's death I went looking for more stories about him. In doing so I came across this nice video produced by Random House Kids. The short video was released in 2010 and it features some poignant moments of Mr. Paulsen talking about his life and his work. Librarians may be especially pleased to hear him talk about how he was inspired to read. 

If you enjoyed Gary Paulsen's books the way that I did, spend a few minutes watching the video. I think you'll like it. 

Self-Paced Professional Development

The primary means through which I am able to keep Free Technology for Teachers going is through consulting and speaking engagements along with the sales of my live and on-demand Practical Ed Tech courses

The latest addition to my catalog of on-demand courses was made last month when I released Search Strategies Students Need to Know. The courses that I offer are a Crash Course in Google Earth and Maps for Social Studies and A Crash Course in Making and Teaching With Video

All three of these courses are completely self-paced. Each course contains six to ten modules that will take you sixty to ninety minutes to complete from start to finish. Of course, as you go through the courses you can go back and review any and all of the modules as often as you like. A certificate of completion is provided at the end of each course. 

Group rates for departments and schools are available for all three courses. Just send me an email at richard (at) byrne.media to learn more about group enrollment.